19th Century Recipes (From Adventist Pioneer[s])

Graham Pudding

Graham Pudding:

This is made by stirring flour into boiling water, as in making hasty pudding. It can be made in twenty minutes, but is improved by boiling slowly an hour. Care is needed that it does not burn. It can be eaten when warm or cold… as best suits the eater.

When left to cool, it should be dipped into cups of dishes to mold, as this improves the appearance of the table as well as the dish itself. Before molding, stoned dates, or nice apples thinly sliced, or fresh berries, may be added, stirring as they are dropped in. This adds to the flavor, and with many does away with the necessity for salt or some rich sauce to make it eatable.
Of all Preparations for food, this stands next to good bread; and to those who live simply, and whose purpose it is to live healthfully, this dish, next to bread, comes to be a staple article on the table, and is liked for its intrinsic merits alone.

Graham Minute Pudding:

A very palatable dish may be made very quickly, by stirring Graham flour into boiling milk, after the manner of hasty pudding, letting it cook for five or ten minutes.
When cold, cut in slices, dip in flour, and fry as griddle-cakes. It makes a most healthful head-cheese.

 

 

(… [with milk, sugar, or sauce,] …was present where the ellipse is above. I do not recommend non-vegan milk or sugar, though maple syrup, honey, applesauce, fruit sauce, or some syrups made from fruit/fruit juice and/or vegan milk might be suitable and delicious with this.

Also, concerning the statements made, please keep in mind this was written in the 19th century/1800’s.

For the boiling milk in the minute pudding, I recommend vegan milk.)

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Potato/Hop Yeast

Wash, pare, and grate, one dozen large potatoes. Boil two large handfuls of hops in five pints of water, and strain it on to the grated potatoes. Add a teacupful of sugar and one-half teacup of salt. Put all in a tin pail or pan, and set into a kettle of boiling water, and stir occasionally till thoroughly cooked. When nearly cool add a pint of good yeast and let it rise. One tablespoonful of this yeast is sufficient for an ordinary loaf of bread. If in a cool place it will keep several months in summer without souring.

From Health, or, How to Live (1865) by James White

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Sweet Brown Bread

Sweet Brown Bread:

Take one quart of rye flour, two quarts of coarse Indian meal, one pint wheat meal half a teaspoon of molasses…and one gill of potato yeast.

Mingle the ingredients into as stiff a dough as can be stirred with a spoon, using warm water for wetting.

Let it rise several hours, or over night; then put it in a large deep pan, and bake five or six hours.

This would be a much more wholesome “wedding cake” than we are accustomed to have proffered us on certain interesting occasions.

From Health, or, How to Live (1865) by James White

(Brown sugar was suggested as an alternative to molasses, or molasses an alternative to brown sugar, but I removed that, because molasses hopefully would be sufficient, but you might like to try a coconut or organic sugar.)

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Rusk

Bread and crackers which are too old for the table, may be used for this. Dry them thoroughly in an oven; when dry, break in a mortar and grind coarsely in a hand or coffee mill. It can be eaten when soaked in milk or warm water, and is relished by almost every one. This is a standard article for the table.

From Health, or, How to Live (1865) by James White

(Please note that this was written in the 19th century/1800’s. Of course, I would recommend vegan milk.)

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Corn Cake

Corn Cake:

Pour one quart boiling water on one quart corn meal, and stir quickly.

Wet the hands, and form the dough into small round cakes one-half of an inch thick.

Bake in a hot oven.

The addition of a few raspberries, huckleberries, or any sub-acid fruit, is a decided improvement.

Sweet apples, chopped fine, are also excellent.

From Health, or, How to Live (1865) by James White

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Rye and Indian Bread (Bonus Apple Bread Pudding Recipe)

Rye and Indian Bread:

Take one part rye meal, or coarse wheat meal, and two parts of Indian; pour boiling water…over the Indian, and stir it till the whole is sufficiently wet to work in the meal without adding any more water, and then, when about milk warm, work in the meal. Should the dough be too stiff, add as much warm, but not hot, water as may be necessary; bake in a round iron dish from three to five hours. This bread, when new, or a day or two old, may be sliced and toasted; it is very sweet and wholesome.

The crust is apt to fall off; this may be wet in water and put in a stone jar with some moderately tart apples, peeled and sliced, nicely covering the apples with the crust; then add a little water, and cover the dish with a tightly fitting cover; set it on the stove till the apples are cooked, and then take the crust off into the plates; sweeten the apples to suit the taste, and spread it over the crust. This is an excellent dish, if care has been taken to prevent burning the crust.

From Health, or, How to Live (1865) by James White

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Wheat Meal Crisps

Wheat Meal Crisps: Make a very stiff dough of Graham flour and cold water; knead thoroughly, roll very thin, and bake from ten to twenty minutes in a hot oven.

From Health, or, How to Live (1865) by James White

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Graham Biscuit

Graham Biscuit: 

Pour boiling water on Graham flour, stirring rapidly till all the flour is wet. Too much stirring makes it tough.

It should be about as thick as can be stirred easily with a strong iron spoon.

Place the dough, with plenty of flour, upon the moulding board, form it into a roll, and slice with a knife into cakes three-fourths of an inch thick, and bake in a hot oven.

Alternative Recipe:

Stir into cold water Graham flour enough for a rather soft dough; knead it five minutes, roll three-fourths of an inch thick, and cut into cakes with a common biscuit cutter. Bake from twenty to thirty minutes in a hot oven.

From Health, or, How to Live (1865) by James White

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Gems

Gems:

Into cold water stir Graham flour sufficient to make a batter about the same consistency as that used for ordinary griddle cakes.

Bake in a hot oven, in the cast-iron bread pans.

The pans should be heated before putting in the batter.
Note: This makes delicious bread. No definite rule as to the proportions of flour and water can be given, owing to the difference in the absorbing proportion of various kinds of flour. If too thin, the cakes will be hollow; if too thick, not so light. A little experience will enable any person to approximate the right proportions with sufficient exactness. The flour should be stirred into the water very slowly, in the same manner as in making mush. If hard water is used, they are apt to be slightly tough. A small quantity of sweet milk will remedy this defect.

Fine Flour Gems: Gems made of fine flour in the same manner as of Graham, the batter being rather stiffer, however, say about like ordinary bread sponge, and baked in the bread pans, are as light, and far sweeter, than any soda biscuit, and by all who have tasted them, are pronounced excellent.

From Health, or, How to Live (1865) by James White

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Potato Pie Crust

Potato Pie Crust: 

Boil one quart dry, mealy potatoes.

The moment they are done mash them, and sift through a colander.

Stir thoroughly together one cup of Graham flour, and one cup of white flour, then add the potatoes, rubbing them evenly through the flour in the same manner as the shortening in common pie crust.

Have ready one cup corn meal; pour over it one and one-third cups boiling water, stirring it till all the meal is wet, then add it to the potatoes and flour, mixing only till thoroughly incorporated together.

No more flour should be added.

The moulding-board should be well covered with dry flour, however, as it is slightly difficult to roll out.

It should be rolled very thin, and baked in a moderate oven.

NOTE. – It is very essential that the above conditions should all be complied with. Bear in mind that the potatoes must be hot, and mixed immediately with the flour; the water be poured, while boiling, upon the corn meal, and the whole mixed together very quickly and baked immediately. Inattention to any of these requisites will be quite apt to insure a failure.

From Health, or, How to Live (1865) by James White

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