Posts Tagged With: recipe

Golden Vegetable Curry

I made this for me and a friend. We both enjoyed it, had two plates each (with rice) on the first evening that it was made, and then ate the leftovers for breakfast. It’s definitely best hot and fresh, and not too spicy. The amount of vegetables is just what I used. You can add more or less, if you’d like. I recommend adding an onion or two (if small) also, and the broccoli is definitely optional. It tasted better than I thought it would, but I only added it because a teacher gave me the broccoli and I needed to use it before it spoiled. Broccoli is healthy and really did go well in this curry, so you might like to try it, too.

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Categories: soups&stews | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lime and Thyme Chick Peas

On Friday I prepared food for Sabbath breakfast and lunch. I had planned on having rice cereal and then thought I might use any leftover rice for rice and chick peas, but it didn’t work out that way. The rice was too hard, I think undercooked. I ate some of it with coconut milk, raisins, dates, and ground flax seed, but it was too crunchy, so I dumped it in the bowl for the rice cooker and put it back in the refrigerator. After church, I mixed in some water and some more raisins (and most of the dates were eaten, but didn’t add any more), and put it back in the rice cooker. When it finished, the coconut milk and water were absorbed. The rice was still a little crunchy, but I think not as much. I added more ground flax seeds and ate that for lunch. This morning and after lunch, I went around the yard taking footage of snails and other creatures for a new Sabbath Discoveries in Nature video (as I haven’t done one in about 6 months). While walking around the yard I checked on the lime and lemon trees. While one lemon was on the ground (for how long, I don’t know, so I left it there), I didn’t find any other lemons on the tree, but I did see two or three limes on the lime tree. Around supper time, I picked one of the limes and washed it off. It seemed soft at first, but then I thought it seemed a little tough, so I was going to knead it on the counter to break up the pulp and make the juice easier to squeeze. As I went to knead the lime, it popped! Guess it was ripe enough. But there was still plenty of juice in the lime, and I squeezed the rest on the cold chick peas, drizzled on some olive oil, and added some Himilayan pink salt and thyme. After mixing it all together, I had nicely seasoned chick peas that are delicious to eat cold. I had the same recipe again for brunch this morning. I didn’t measure the ingredients, so I recommend adding it all to taste, starting with a little and adding more, or if you’ve been cooking for a while and have good judgement on how much to use, use as much as seems best to you. For those who must have measurements, start with 1-2 tsp of olive oil, a pinch or two of salt, and two or three pinches of crushed thyme leaves. If you have thyme powder, maybe start with one pinch, and you need about 1/2-1 lime of key lime size, all for about 1 – 1 1/2 cup of cooked, chilled chick peas. Just mix it all together. Taste, and add more seasonings and lime juice as needed. You can use lemon juice instead, if available.

Categories: beans | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Sour Cream

You need to add the herbs. It’s so much better that way.

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Categories: condiments | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Whipped Cream

Fluffy, creamy, and sweet. This delicious treat is simple and easy to make. I whipped it up yesterday and mixed it into rice with some sliced banana and roasted sunflower seeds (actually, I thought I was buying pumpkin seeds and should have paid more attention, but the sunflower seeds were ok) to make a kind of rice pudding, but can imagine that this would be a delicious compliment to pumpkin, apple, or any kind of sweet pie, cobbler, pudding, fruit salad, or a crisp. This is one that I think I can make over and over again (when I’m not making fig spread). It’s simple, quick, and easy, too. You only need two ingredients and a few minutes.

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Peanut Butter Banana No-Bakes

It’s hot season here in Thailand—too hot to really enjoy a steaming bowl of oatmeal, but these are a good alternative for breakfast and/or supper during the hot summer months, and can be eaten as a lightly sweetened dessert, too. Being a dump-and-pour cook, I didn’t measure the ingredients, but if you have too much of one thing, you can compensate with another (too much oats, add more coconut milk/peanut butter) (if the mix is too liquid, add more oats). Mix well before adding anything extra, though, and taste to see if it’s sweet enough. I think it’s just right for me.

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Black Beans in Barbecue Sauce

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Medeterranian Quinoa

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Graham Pudding

Graham Pudding:

This is made by stirring flour into boiling water, as in making hasty pudding. It can be made in twenty minutes, but is improved by boiling slowly an hour. Care is needed that it does not burn. It can be eaten when warm or cold… as best suits the eater.

When left to cool, it should be dipped into cups of dishes to mold, as this improves the appearance of the table as well as the dish itself. Before molding, stoned dates, or nice apples thinly sliced, or fresh berries, may be added, stirring as they are dropped in. This adds to the flavor, and with many does away with the necessity for salt or some rich sauce to make it eatable.
Of all Preparations for food, this stands next to good bread; and to those who live simply, and whose purpose it is to live healthfully, this dish, next to bread, comes to be a staple article on the table, and is liked for its intrinsic merits alone.

Graham Minute Pudding:

A very palatable dish may be made very quickly, by stirring Graham flour into boiling milk, after the manner of hasty pudding, letting it cook for five or ten minutes.
When cold, cut in slices, dip in flour, and fry as griddle-cakes. It makes a most healthful head-cheese.

 

 

(… [with milk, sugar, or sauce,] …was present where the ellipse is above. I do not recommend non-vegan milk or sugar, though maple syrup, honey, applesauce, fruit sauce, or some syrups made from fruit/fruit juice and/or vegan milk might be suitable and delicious with this.

Also, concerning the statements made, please keep in mind this was written in the 19th century/1800’s.

For the boiling milk in the minute pudding, I recommend vegan milk.)

Categories: 19th Century Recipes (From Adventist Pioneer[s]) | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Potato/Hop Yeast

Wash, pare, and grate, one dozen large potatoes. Boil two large handfuls of hops in five pints of water, and strain it on to the grated potatoes. Add a teacupful of sugar and one-half teacup of salt. Put all in a tin pail or pan, and set into a kettle of boiling water, and stir occasionally till thoroughly cooked. When nearly cool add a pint of good yeast and let it rise. One tablespoonful of this yeast is sufficient for an ordinary loaf of bread. If in a cool place it will keep several months in summer without souring.

From Health, or, How to Live (1865) by James White

Categories: 19th Century Recipes (From Adventist Pioneer[s]) | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sweet Brown Bread

Sweet Brown Bread:

Take one quart of rye flour, two quarts of coarse Indian meal, one pint wheat meal half a teaspoon of molasses…and one gill of potato yeast.

Mingle the ingredients into as stiff a dough as can be stirred with a spoon, using warm water for wetting.

Let it rise several hours, or over night; then put it in a large deep pan, and bake five or six hours.

This would be a much more wholesome “wedding cake” than we are accustomed to have proffered us on certain interesting occasions.

From Health, or, How to Live (1865) by James White

(Brown sugar was suggested as an alternative to molasses, or molasses an alternative to brown sugar, but I removed that, because molasses hopefully would be sufficient, but you might like to try a coconut or organic sugar.)

Categories: 19th Century Recipes (From Adventist Pioneer[s]) | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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